The Xline 2000R metal 3D printer from Concept Laser.

In fact, it’s the biggest metal 3D printer in the world so far, with a build volume of 800 x 400 x 500 mm³!

The metal melting machine weighs about 900 kg and carries a price tag of $3.5 million, so it’s surprising that only five printers have been manufactured so far, and it’s a pretty big deal when a company or university decides to invest in one.

The latest purchase an Xline 2000R is Melbourne, Australia’s Monash University, a school we see quite frequently in the news for 3D printed anatomical models, 3D printed aerospace components and other advanced 3D printing applications.

Monash is particularly involved in metal 3D printing, with a spinoff company called Amaero Engineering entirely dedicated to 3D technology. If you’re going to invest in a $3.5 million metal additive manufacturing machine, you’d better have a decent metal additive manufacturing program.

Not only is Monash University’s only one of five who have the 3D printer, but it’s also the only one outside of America, Europe and the only one in the Southern Hemisphere available for contract manufacturing.

“The new printer allows us to make large complex shapes and unique tools quicker, lighter and with less waste,” said Professor Xinhua Wu, who leads the Monash University 3D printing initiative.

So what does one do after installing the biggest 3D printer in the world?

3D print the biggest metal part in the world, of course – or at least the biggest metal aerospace component made with a powder bed 3D printer. Although Cranfield University still maintain the record for biggest metal 3D printed part all around and ORNL/Boeing, but the massive door hinge printed by Monash and Amaero is nothing to sneeze at.

The hinge is from a Chinese jet airliner and weighs 11 kgs.

The two organizations will be presenting the part at the Australian International Airshow in 2017, which is taking place at the Avalon Airport in Geelong from March 3 to 5.

Finnin-with-the-3D-printed-door-hinge

Amaero CEO with the 3D printed door hinge.

In addition to the hinge, Monash and Amaero are also displaying the first-ever 3D printed jet engine, a Safran gas turbine engine from a Falcon executive jet, which they printed in 2015; a large and complex air intake component; and a cutaway view of a new design for a rocket motor.

Amaero and Monash University have big plans for the Xline 2000R.

“This new printer creates promising opportunities for advanced manufacturing in Australia for global markets,” said Amaero CEO Barrie Finnin. “Last year, we printed production components that are now flying in passenger jets and small turbojet engines. Our technology is also now operating in our manufacturing facility in Toulouse with our partner Safran—the French-based global aerospace and defense company. “Now we can literally go bigger. This new capability will be of great interest to our aerospace and automotive customers in Europe, North America, Asia and Australia.”

You can learn more about the 3D printed jet engine in the video below:

Monash Centre for Additive Manufacturing Promo Video
Share

Leave A Comment

For security, use of Google's reCAPTCHA service is required which is subject to the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

If you agree to these terms, please click here.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.